DESERT DON'S NATIVE AMERICAN
ROCK ART GALLERY


   Rock Shelter, Carrizo Gorge, Anza-Borrego State Park

It is thought that the above pictographs were made during male initiation rites and after the
participants had ingested the hallucinogenic desert  plant, jimsonweed ( Datura sp.)



This petroglyph, partially covered by lichen, in California's Coso Range is
thought to have been made during a shaman's vision quest for rain.


The following shaman petroglyphs are from the Coso Range:

Rain shamans traveled great distances to go to the Coso Range which was considered a powerful place
for acquiring control over the weather.  The shaman entered a trance and contacted spirit helpers for making rain.
The spirit helpers were bighorn sheep.  There are hundreds of sheep images in the Coso Range.


 It is theorized that the depictions of the sheep had nothing to do with hunting but were a metaphor for the shaman's
ritual death (i.e., going into a trance) in order to communicate with the sheep and gain the power to make rain.


The following pictographs are more mysterious in nature

Rock shelter in Cahuilla territory, near Anza, CA




       Rock Shelter, near Catavina, Baja California.  Notice the similarities in this pictograph
       panel to the one below.  Even though they are located hundreds of miles apart,
they are both attributed to the Kumeyaay people of Baja and Alta California.



Rock Shelter, Indian Hill, Anza-Borrego Desert State Park




Rock Shelter, Near Vallecito, Anza Borrego




Inkopah Mtns., San Diego County




Inkopah Mtns.



Lizard Pictograph, Jacumba Mtns., CA


skeleton picotgraphs
Unusual human-like skeleton pictographs near ancient burial ground, Inkopah Mtns., CA



A mysterious petroglyph in a canyon near Ocotillo, CA


 The next petrogyph is very unusual and consists only of incised lines and circles.
This type of rock art, known as Pit and Groove, is thought to be some of the oldest rock art in North America


Pit and Groove Petroglyph, Coyote Mtns.


The following rock carvings, called yonis,  are thought to be associated with female fertility:


Carved Yoni near Solstice Cave, Upper Indian Valley, Anza-Borrego State Park



Large Carved Yoni on Indian Hill, Anza-Borrego



Three small carved yonis, Indian Hill


yoni- inkopah
Yoni near Canebrake


Rock Shelter in Anza Borrego, pictures by Tim and collage with filters by Stan
Rock Shelter in Anza Borrego, pictures by Tim and collage with filters by Stan


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©  2009 Don Gennero
natureboy4 at cox dot net