Introduction to Marine Biology
(MARS 294)
Spring 2013

Dr. Ron Kaufmann
Office: Shiley Center 274; x5904; kaufmann<at>sandiego<dot>edu or rkaufmann<at>gmail<dot>com
Office Hours: Monday 12:30-2:00, Thursday 2:30-4:30, Friday 12:30-2:00, or by appointment

 

WEEK TOPICS LECTURES  CHAPTERS


 

Jan 29

Jan 31

Introduction, Life in the Ocean

Structure of the Ocean, Scientific Method

Jan 29

Jan 31

2, 4
1, 2, 3

Feb 5

Feb 7

Taxonomy, Marine Microbes
M
arine Microbes

Feb 5

Feb 7

5, 6
6

Feb 12

Feb 14

Multicellular Protists
Marine Flowering Plants

Feb 12

Feb 14

7
7

Feb 19

Feb 21

Marine Flowering Plants
Exam #1

Feb 19

Review Sheet

7, 14
1-7, 14

Feb 26
Feb 28

Lower Invertebrates
Low
er Invertebrates

Feb 26

Feb 28

8, 15

8

Mar 5

Mar 7

Higher Invertebrates
Higher Invertebrates

Mar 5

Mar 7

9, 13
9, 14

Mar 12

Mar 14

Higher Invertebrates
Higher Invertebrates

Mar 12

Mar 14

9, 16
9, 17

Mar 19

Mar 21

Higher Invertebrates
Exam #2

Mar 19

Review Sheet

9, 18
8-9, 13-17

Mar 26

Mar 28

Spring Break - No Class
Spring Break - No Class
   
 

Apr 2

Apr 4

Higher Invertebrates
Marine Fishes

Apr 2

Apr 4

9
10

Apr 9

Apr 11

Marine Fishes
Marine Fishes

Apr 9
Apr 11

10
10

Apr 16

Apr 18

Marine Fishes
Exam #3

Apr 16

Review Sheet

10
9, 10, 18

Apr 23

Apr 25

Marine Reptiles
Marine Reptiles and Birds

Apr 23

Apr 25

11
11

Apr 30

May 2

Marine Birds
Marine Mammals

Apr 30

May 2

11
12

May 7

May 9

Marine Mammals
Marine Mammals

May 7

May 9

12
12

FINAL EXAM  Tuesday, May 21, 11:00-1:00    Review Sheet

Text:  Introduction to Marine Biology, Fourth Edition, Karleskint, Turner and Small

*Additional, required readings may be assigned during the semester.

Grades
 
     Exams (3)
100 points
 each
     Final Exam (non-cumulative portion)
100 points

     Final Exam (cumulative portion)
50 points

     Attendance/Participation
50 points

     Lecture Total
500 points

     Lab Total

300 points

 
     COURSE TOTAL
800 points

 

Course Objectives
    This course is an introductory survey of the major groups of organisms, their characteristics and adaptations, with a focus on organisms inhabiting the marine environment.  Throughout this course, we will emphasize evolutionary developments that unite and/or separate major groups and adaptations to the conditions in which organisms occur.  This course fulfills the Core Curriculum requirement for Life Science with Laboratory.

            This course covers a lot of information, which can pile up quickly if you’re not careful.  If you stay current on the assigned reading, attend class and pay attention in lecture, you should be able to keep up.  I expect that this class will be challenging; I hope you also find it to be interesting and fun!  If you're having trouble or are concerned about your performance in this course, please contact me as soon as possible.  I will try my best to answer your questions and help you succeed.  Besides coming to my office hours, the best way to reach me is by e-mail.

 

Learning Outcomes
    After taking this course, you should be able to

Exams
    There will be NO make-up exams in this course without prior approval from the instructor.  This means that if you give me enough advance notice and there is a compelling reason why you must miss a scheduled exam we can probably work something out.  If you wait until the last minute before telling me that you can't make it to an exam, I'm likely to be much less forgiving.  Travel plans do NOT constitute a valid excuse for missing ANY exam.  If there is an emergency that prevents you from taking an exam, please contact me PRIOR to the exam time.  This policy includes the final exam.  If you require extra time or accommodation on exams, please let me know as soon as possible and at least two weeks before an exam.

Participation
    Class attendance and participation are important components of the learning experience.  As a university student you are responsible for your own attendance and conduct.  I will not take formal attendance in class.  However, if you do not show up regularly or if you consistently arrive late, your final grade will suffer as a result.  Participation in class includes asking questions, being involved in discussions, and generally behaving like a real, live, interested, person.  If you tend to be shy by nature, don’t worry: I don’t expect each of you to ask three questions every day (that would be ~60 questions a day!).  However, if you go the entire semester without ever uttering a word in class, you aren’t trying hard enough.  If I go over material too rapidly or too slowly, or if I explain something that doesn’t make sense or that you don’t understand, please raise your hand and bring the problem to my attention.

    The use of cell phones and handheld devices during class is not allowed.  Please turn off the sound-making function on your phones before class begins.  If someone's phone rings/buzzes during class, I will ask you to turn it off.  If this occurs a second time during the semester, I will ask you to leave the room.  You may use a notebook computer or tablet to take notes or view the PowerPoint presentation for that class.  However, you should not browse the internet, read/write e-mail, or do other activities that are not related to the lecture.  If you violate this rule, you will be asked to leave the room and penalized 10 points.

 

Extra Credit
    In addition to the 500 "mandatory" points, it will be possible to earn up to 20 extra credit points by successfully completing additional assignment(s).  You may earn up to five points each by writing a one-page summary of a recent article on a topic related to the content of this course or a marine biology seminar that you attend.  Guidelines for these summaries are below.  You may turn in up to four summaries, including no more than three from either category.  Completion of summaries is not sufficient to receive full credit, and substandard summaries will earn fewer points.  Summaries should be sent by e-mail as .doc, .docx or .pdf files and received by 11:59 pm on Sunday, May 12.  Materials received after that time will not be accepted.

    Paper Summary: Read a current (within the last year) article published in the media (newspaper, magazine, online).  Turn in a one-page summary of the article, including the author’s name, title, and source (publication name, volume, date published, page numbers, or URL if online), and a synopsis of the major points.  Include a brief paragraph about how the article content relates to a concept or organism that you've studied in class.  You must get my approval for the article before writing your summary.  Summaries of articles that were not approved in advance will not be accepted.

    Seminar Summary: Attend a departmental or senior seminar in the Marine Science and Environmental Studies Department or another seminar presented at USD, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Birch Aquarium, SDSU, or other institution.  You must get my approval before attending the seminars.  Summaries of seminars that were not approved in advance will not be accepted.  Turn in a one-page summary of the seminar, including the speaker’s name, title, date and location of talk, and a synopsis of the major points.  Include a brief paragraph about how the seminar content relates to a concept or organism that you've studied in class.  Seminar summaries must be submitted no later than one week after the presentation date.

Academic Integrity
    The use of information from published sources can create some confusion about proper use and referencing of material that you did not generate yourself.  Here are some guidelines to help you use but not misuse information produced by others.  The only substantial writing you are likely to do for this class is extra credit summaries, and the academic integrity concept applies to those just as it would to a more substantial paper for any class.  For writing assignments in general, it is expected that you will read material and incorporate into your papers some of the findings and ideas contained in those published works.  When you refer to information generated by someone else, it is important to credit the source of that information.  Commonly, that credit comes in the form of a parenthetical citation.  For example:

    Global climate change has been implicated in the decline of zooplankton biomass in the eastern Pacific during the second half of the 20th century (Roemmich and McGowan, 1995).
    This sentence contains a conclusion described by Roemmich and McGowan in a paper published in 1995.  It could be appropriate for you to include a sentence like this in one of your papers, but since you didn’t perform the research that led to this conclusion you need to cite the people who did.
    Neglecting to properly cite another person’s work is a form of plagiarism, the practice of reporting someone else’s work as your own.  There are other forms of plagiarism as well, including: copying portions of text verbatim from published sources (including the internet), receiving unauthorized assistance on papers, and drawing material from similar papers written by other students.  Plagiarism constitutes a serious breach of professional ethics as well as a violation of the University of San Diego’s academic integrity policy.  If an instructor has reason to believe that an act of plagiarism has occurred, an academic integrity report must be filed with the dean of the college and an academic integrity hearing may be convened.  If the academic integrity hearing committee determines that plagiarism has occurred, disciplinary action may range from loss of points or a grade penalty to expulsion from the university.  Bottom line: do your own work and don’t copy the work of others.  Plagiarism is unethical, it’s way too easy to get caught, and being called before an academic integrity hearing committee is far more unpleasant than simply writing your own papers.
    Other areas in which academic integrity violations commonly occur include cheating on exams and unauthorized collaboration on assignments that are meant to be performed individually.  As with plagiarism, any form of cheating is unethical, and getting caught is much more likely than you might imagine.  Any questions about acceptable procedures for sharing of data, exchange of ideas, citation of sources, or any other academic integrity issues should be addressed to your instructor.  Better safe than sorry!

This page and all contents copyright 2005-2013 by Ron Kaufmann
All rights reserved
Last modified 2 May 2013 by Ron Kaufmann